In The News

$7.5-million mid-century home on the Presidio Wall comes to market for the second time ever

It was originally designed for a famed winemaker

Emily LandesJuly 1, 2020Updated: July 1, 2020 4:05 a.m.Comments

When Arnold and Madeline Schuster bought 3555 Pacific Avenue back in 1985, the Presidio was still in the hands of the U.S. military. It would take almost another decade before the former army base was transferred to the National Park Service, changing the ownership of the Presidio Wall Playground the home overlooked. Regardless of who owned the 1,500-acre open space, Madeline joked that her friends referred to it as the couple’s “borrowed landscape.”

Those friends were one of several reasons the Schusters, now approaching their 80s, were reticent to leave their longtime home. “We love the home and have made such wonderful friendships that became like family that it took us over two years to finally make the decision to sell,” Schuster said. “We will miss the ever-changing views of the San Francisco Bay and the natural air conditioning of the fog. We love the way we were able to display our art and how easily the home flowed when we entertained.”

But warmer climates were calling and the Schusters decided to put their over-3,700-square-foot four-bedroom, 5.5-bath on the market for $7.5 million, or just over $2,000 a square foot. While many their age would be downsizing, Schuster said they actually “upsized” to a condo in a 15-unit amenity-filled building in Palm Beach, Florida. “We are fortunate that we can live here with a beautiful view of the ocean and the intra-coastal waterway,” she said.

The home was designed in 1949 for Louis and Miriam Honig, who went on to found Honig Vineyard. It was one of the few residential properties by architects Wayne Hertzka and William Knowles, who are better known for their downtown office buildings like the Crown Zellerbach Building (AKA One Bush Plaza) and the PG&E headquarters on Beale Street.
OpenHomes Photography
The home was designed in 1949 for Louis and Miriam Honig, who went on to found Honig Vineyard. It was one of the few residential properties by architects Wayne Hertzka and William Knowles, who are better known for their downtown office buildings like the Crown Zellerbach Building (AKA One Bush Plaza) and the PG&E headquarters on Beale Street.
The Honigs lived in the home until they sold to the Schusters in 1985. Both families were big art collectors, and the protected front entry provides a good spot to display a sculpture.
OpenHomes Photography
The Honigs lived in the home until they sold to the Schusters in 1985. Both families were big art collectors, and the protected front entry provides a good spot to display a sculpture.
During their long-term ownership of the home, the Schusters updated the kitchen with Carrera marble counters and stainless steel appliances.
OpenHomes Photography
During their long-term ownership of the home, the Schusters updated the kitchen with Carrera marble counters and stainless steel appliances.
Off the kitchen is an informal eat-in area as well as a more formal dining room.
OpenHomes PhotographyOff the kitchen is an informal eat-in area as well as a more formal dining room. “My husband’s office asked us to host numerous functions since it was just as easy to entertain 50 as it was to have a couple over for a casual dinner,” said Schuster.
The informal eat-in area has sliding glass doors that lead out to the private patio.
OpenHomes Photography
The informal eat-in area has sliding glass doors that lead out to the private patio.
Upstairs, the master bedroom looks out over the Presidio all the way to the bay.
OpenHomes Photography
Upstairs, the master bedroom looks out over the Presidio all the way to the bay.
This upper level has two more bedrooms as well as a large sitting room.
OpenHomes Photography
This upper level has two more bedrooms as well as a large sitting room.
This bedroom and the sitting area can both access a private deck.
OpenHomes Photography
This bedroom and the sitting area can both access a private deck.
With the Presidio in front and a private garden in the back, the home has been attractive to today's buyers, said listing agent Nina Hatvany.
OpenHomes Photography
With the Presidio in front and a private garden in the back, the home has been attractive to today’s buyers, said listing agent Nina Hatvany. “I think the biggest thing that resonates with buyers is the indoor-outdoor feel of the house. Almost every room opens onto a deck or a patio and the house looks out over the beautiful garden and the bucolic greenery of the Presidio,” she said. “That’s very appealing to buyers right now.”Emily Landes is a writer and editor obsessed with all things real estate. 

Check out our Compass California Blog for more content!

Home Trends | Our Agents | Market Snapshot | Whats Happening